First Look at Song Joong Ki and Park Bo Young in Wolf Boy

Having Song Joong Ki play a feral wolf boy is like a stroke of casting brilliance. The boy looks as cuddly as a baby panda, so clearly he’s going to have to use his acting prowess to convince me he’s a dangerous threat to humanity. The first stills are out for the upcoming K-movie Wolf Boy starring Song Joong Ki in the titular role and Park Bo Young as his love interest. From the synopsis, which I translated below, it looks like they grow up together and she’s a major reason for the wolf boy adapting back to human life. I’ve been dying for Park Bo Young to return to acting since she totally stole my heart in Speedy Scandal, which I can’t wrap my head around the fact that its been four years already since the movie came out. I don’t blame Park Bo Young for taking a shining to the wolf boy she finds in a remote farming village. If I saw Song Joong Ki, I’d adopt him even if he was a mermaid.

Synopsis of Wolf Boy:

Upon receiving an unexpected phone call, an old woman returns to the countryside farm of her youth. She still remembers the young boy she met almost half a century ago. The little girl who just moved to this farming village discovered a “wolf boy”. A strong but bodily contorted boy who hid himself in the darkness. Even though she is old know, she will never be able to forget the wolf boy’s eyes full of wildness and his animal gestures. She remembers when she began to teach the boy to patiently wait for food, to wear clothes, to speak, to write, so that one day he could be like a normal human being. The young girl opened her heart to this guileless boy, and he fell in love with the girl, the one person who treated him with care. But when he becomes threatened, the wolf boy cannot control his animal instincts and he becomes a liability for the village. To protect this boy who would die to stay beside her, the girl left him. She only left him with the words “Wait for me, I will return for you.”

© 2012, ockoala. All rights reserved.


Comments

First Look at Song Joong Ki and Park Bo Young in Wolf Boy — 17 Comments

  1. Wow. Sounds like another Edward Scissorhands. Don’t know if that’s a good or bad thing as I will always have a soft spot for the Burton-Depp tandem of gothic camp and an 80-90s flavour to family entertainment. Wolf Boy should be watchable and enjoyable at best.

  2. Ahh~~ I absolutely adore and respect the passionate acting of Song Joong Ki! And what makes this movie even better is that is seems to be based off Edward Scissorhands, which is also a movie of depth, sincerity, love, protection – all the right notes in all the right places. ^-^ Even if they aren’t together in the end, if it is anything similar to the storyline in ES, I will still love it dearly~~ I can’t wait! :D

  3. Song Joong Ki character is defined as being:

    a feral child (or a wild child) who is a human child who has lived isolated from human contact from a very young age, and has no (or little) experience of human care, loving or social behavior, and, crucially, of human language. Some feral children have been confined by people (usually their own parents); in some cases this child abandonment was due to the parents’ rejection of a child’s severe intellectual or physical impairment. Feral children may have experienced severe child abuse or trauma before being abandoned or running away. Others are alleged to have been brought up by animals; some are said to have lived in the wild on their own. Over one hundred cases of supposedly feral children are known.

    Myths, legends, and fictional stories have depicted feral children reared by wild animals such as wolves and bears. Famous examples include Ibn Tufail’s Hayy, Ibn al-Nafis’ Kamil, Rudyard Kipling’s Mowgli, Edgar Rice Burroughs’s Tarzan, J. M. Barrie’s Peter Pan, and the legends of Atalanta, Enkidu and Romulus and Remus.
    Legendary and fictional feral children are often depicted as growing up with relatively normal human intelligence and skills and an innate sense of culture or civilization, coupled with a healthy dose of survival instincts; their integration into human society is made to seem relatively easy. One notable exception is Mowgli, for whom living with humans proved to be extremely difficult.
    These mythical children are often depicted as having superior strength, intelligence and morals compared to “normal” humans, the implication being that because of their upbringing they represent humanity in a pure and uncorrupted state: similar to thenoble savage.
    The subject is treated with a certain amount of realism in François Truffaut’s 1970 film L’Enfant Sauvage (UK: The Wild Boy, US: The Wild Child), where a scientist’s efforts in trying to rehabilitate a feral boy meet with great difficulty

    Cr: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  4. There is a manga with the similar story, I think, but I forgot the name. But hopefully I will end up watching it.

  5. When i read the initial articles here and there, I always pictured Micheal J Fox – teen wolf.
    So Joong Ki isn’s actually a warewolf???

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